News

Library events and news


Events

25 August–3 October

On 4 August 1914 Britain declared war on Germany after invading Belgium as part of a pre-emptive strike on France. Britain’s decision meant that Australia was also at war. Initial disbelief was quickly replaced by enthusiastic support, though the war ultimately brought with it a terrible cost.

UOW Reflects on The Great War has been developed by UOW Library in collaboration with Associate Professor John McQuilton and Dr Jen Roberts from the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts. Exhibits are drawn from University Archives, the Illawarra Museum and local collections.

This exhibition seeks to share the experience of the First World War through a local perspective and highlight its broader impact on Australian society.

OPEN: 9am to 5pm Weekdays and 11am to 4pm weekends in the Library Panizzi Room. University of Wollongong, Building 16, Northfields Ave, Wollongong.

Special presentations

Tuesday, 1pm, 30 September, Panizzi Room.
ANZAC: The Birth? Or Death Of A Nation?
Dr Georgine Clarsen
Just months after the Gallipoli landing the Australian press were declaring that Australia was born on the beaches and slopes of the Dardanelles. Of course, Australia as a formal political entity—a modern state—was born 15 years earlier in 1901, with the federation of the six independent colonies. The idea that Australia was born on the beaches of Gallipoli, however, continues to be heard and widely believed right to the present day. This talk considers why it seemed important to have a nation born through bloodshed in 1915 and if that continues to be a useful way to think about the Australian nation today.

Wednesday, 12:30pm, 1 October, Panizzi Room.
Writing home
Letter Readings of correspondence between WW1 Soldier William Agate, the AIF and his family by UOW Creative Arts students.

Wednesday, 1:00pm, 1 October, Panizzi Room.
The Keiraville Honour Board - A Community Impact Case Study
Dr Jen Roberts
While the Great War affected all of Australia and changed its course of history, it was in the small towns and communities that we find the true impact of that conflict. This talk focusses on the Wollongong suburb of Keiraville and the stories of courage, loss and pride among local families as they sought to come to terms with the ‘war to end all wars’. The Keiraville Honour Board is one of the expressions of that town’s need to remember the boys who fought, and the boys who never came home.

Friday, 1pm, 3 October, Panizzi Room.
Collections and Personal Reflections
John Shipp, Illawarra Historical Society and Illawarra Museum.
A discussion of relics relating to WW1 veterans Jack Lindoy and Bert Potter which are housed in the Illawarra Museum.

Full presentation schedule [PDF]

Community and school groups are welcome to visit this exhibition and attend the special presentations.

Visit our UOW Reflects On The Great War Online Exhibition

11 April–8 May 2014

Collected, Connected, and Cut: Artists' Books Exhibition

10am to 4pm Monday to Friday & 12.30pm to 3.30pm Saturday and Sunday

Panizzi Room, Library

Free book construction demonstration each Wednesday during the exhibition, 12.15 to 1.45pm.

More information

 


 

News

9 June 2014

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The University of Wollongong Library has recently made available online historical film footage from the Royal Visit to Wollongong by Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in February 1954.

More than 120,000 people lined the streets and enthusiastically greeted the young Queen and Prince during one of the greatest welcomes the City has imparted to a visitor.

The film was acquired from a local collector in January this year and has been digitised and made available to the public by the University of Wollongong Library.

The clip can be viewed on the UOW Library website, which also includes a ‘then and now’ view of the route taken through Wollongong by the Queen’s Royal procession, as well as historical images and newspaper reports.

1 May 2014

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UOW Library has partnered with the Wollongong City Council Libraries to make 98 years of the Illawarra Mercury available on line, with Council Library staff and University staff working together to digitise more than 60,000 pages of the Illawarra Mercury dated from 1856 to 1954.

Scanned copies of the paper held by the State Library of New South Wales are now freely available to search and download through the National Library of Australia’s TROVE database.

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Last reviewed: 24 September, 2014